Rehabilitation

Pardon me for not being able to update the site as frequently as possible for the past few weeks. But I have an excuse: I was busy rehabilitating my right knee which underwent arthroscopic surgery on July 7.
The rehab was not that grueling but it was enough to take away some of the activities that I had been accustomed to. The first two weeks were quite difficult. The muscles as well as the underlying tissues around the operated area were still painful and moving them – specially laterally- rang up the pain notes up my nervous system.
The set of exercises were simple ones and were designed to regain mobility in the affected area, in the least possible time. But the frequency – five times a day – was simply too time consuming that it offered me no other recourse except to deal with them in most of my waking hours.
There was the knee-joint press while lying on my back; the leg raises; the hip-raise with both knees flexed while lying on your back; flexing the bad knee as far back as you can while it dangled on the edge of the bed; while seated, bending my hips towards the knee with the bad leg straight-up and the good leg flexed; raising and lowering the hip joints with my back against the door, while standing and with both knees flexed.
There were also the exercises that required the aid of a rubber tube (as resistance) attached to the ankle of the good leg. With the good leg propping me up, it involved moving in all four directions – and as far as possible – the affected leg. There was also one exercise that involved trying to walk as straight as possible — on a 3″ wide by 8″ long piece of wood.
And finally, there was the one that required me to move up and down a flight of three-step stairs — backwards.
All of them basically stressed movements on the muscles around the bad knee so as to drain any fluids that had accumulated in the knee joint areas. The myofibrils (tiny fibers that comprise the muscle), when they’re used up after a rigorous exercise, tend to ‘drink-up’ any fluids around them. Much like the same way we crave for water when we’re very tired.
—links:
www.healthatoz.com
www.kaiserpermanente.org
www.arthroscopy.com